Old Photos, New Meaning: Why I Revisited My Storytelling Roots

National Geographic Education staff member Jean Shapiro Cantu wrote this post. When the scans arrived, feelings of excitement and joy washed over me.  Living in New York City in the 1970s, I took thousands of black-and-white photos of street life—of fathers with their children, workers on lunch break, and sunrises reflecting off skyscrapers. As I grew older and started a family of my own, I … Continue reading Old Photos, New Meaning: Why I Revisited My Storytelling Roots

How I Went From Fearing the Ocean to Protecting It

This post was written by #GenGeo community member Prashant Mohesh. Growing up in Mauritius, I loved to explore nature. Behind my house there is a mountain named Le Pouce, whose forest and trails I spent a lot of time wandering as a kid. However, my instinct for exploration stopped at the water’s edge. Even though Mauritius is an island country surrounded by the Indian Ocean, … Continue reading How I Went From Fearing the Ocean to Protecting It

Storytelling Is Essential in the Fight for Social Justice

This post was written by 2020 Young Explorer Zoë Jenkins. In middle school, I was placed into the gifted program. To me, it seemed like administrators put the gifted students into some of the lowest-performing schools in the district. The kids in the gifted program tended to be bussed in from the other side of town, and I felt like we were unfairly placed on … Continue reading Storytelling Is Essential in the Fight for Social Justice