The #TeachNatGeo List: Getting Your Kids to Connect With the Outdoors

Whether it’s a warm beautiful day, or a muddy, rainy one, kids shouldn’t feel stuck indoors. Here are a few of Nat Geo’s favorite ways to get kids connected to nature for some major fun (and learning, too)! What have you done lately to connect your kids with nature? Chat with us and each other on Facebook and Twitter using the #TeachNatGeo hashtag. Continue reading The #TeachNatGeo List: Getting Your Kids to Connect With the Outdoors

Kids birdwatching

Educator Spotlight: Following the Journeys of Backyard Birds

Amy Clapp is a K-6 science teacher at Salisbury Community School in Salisbury, Vermont. Amy has been teaching elementary school for 16 years. Activity: Mapping Local Migratory Birds Subjects: Science Grades: K-6 Tell us about your activity. How long did it take and what did you need to prepare? In this lesson, students learn about the birds that live in their own backyards. They learn … Continue reading Educator Spotlight: Following the Journeys of Backyard Birds

Go on a Biodiversity Expedition

This activity is designed to be used in part or as a whole and is adaptable for classroom or informal educational settings. By Julie Brown, National Geographic Project Manager Laptops are closed, the car is packed, and you’re headed to where your kids can run wild and free. Here’s a new way to keep them busy and curious along the way and while you’re on … Continue reading Go on a Biodiversity Expedition

Photograph of an apple snail.

Word of the Week: Invasive Species

invasive species (ihn-VAY-sihv SPEE-seez) noun. type of plant or animal that is not indigenous to a particular area and causes economic or environmental harm. A participant during a BioBlitz in Louisiana’s Jean Lafitte National Historical Park found this apple snail. Apple snails are native to South America. They likely entered the ecosystem around Jean Lafitte when they were released from someone’s aquarium. As an invasive species, … Continue reading Word of the Week: Invasive Species

Lions and Tigers and Bears, Oh No!

ENVIRONMENT Big, fierce animals—lions and tigers and bears, for example—are relatively scarce in nature. That’s normal. But top predators are now so rare that many are in danger of disappearing. That’s creating ripple effects throughout the natural world that scientists are still trying to figure out. (NPR) Use our resources to better understand predators and their role in a region’s ecology. Discussion Ideas Scientists in … Continue reading Lions and Tigers and Bears, Oh No!