Educator Spotlight: Investigating the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

Blade Shepherd-Jones led students through a hands-on study of the hazards of marine debris. Students explored the effects of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch on the marine animals native to the Hawaiian islands and their beachfront community. Their study culminated in student-led nature clean-ups, after which students made sculptures from debris depicting animals affected by marine pollution. Continue reading Educator Spotlight: Investigating the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

Explosive Volcano? Just Add Water

SCIENCE Scientists are warning of “ballistic rocks” hurled from Kilauea’s crater. So, steer clear of the erupting volcano, people. (Nat Geo News) Use our resources to learn more about craters and the lava lakes they sometimes hold. Discussion Ideas Scientists warn that if the lava lake at Halema’uma’u falls below the water table, the generally gentle Kilauea volcano may get explosive. What is a lava … Continue reading Explosive Volcano? Just Add Water

Why Kilauea’s Eruption Makes Volcanologists Nervous

SCIENCE It’s not exactly the sudden explosion that many Americans imagine when they hear the words volcanic eruption. But for exactly that reason, “it’s the kind of eruption that makes volcanologists nervous.” (The Atlantic) Use our activity to help students investigate how Kilauea’s erupts. Teachers, scroll down for a quick list of key resources in our Teachers Toolkit.   Discussion Ideas The great big Kilauea … Continue reading Why Kilauea’s Eruption Makes Volcanologists Nervous

Hawaii May Ban Sunscreen

ENVIRONMENT From Banana Boat to Coppertone, major sunscreen brands may soon have to revamp their products or stop selling them in Hawaii, which is looking out for its coral reefs. (Washington Post) Sunscreens are probably damaging oyster reefs, too. Teachers, scroll down for a quick list of key resources in our Teachers Toolkit. Discussion Ideas The Aloha State, Hawaii, may ban some sunscreens. What is … Continue reading Hawaii May Ban Sunscreen

Why Two Volcanoes in Hawaii Are So Close, but So Different

SCIENCE Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa, two volcanoes which have beguiled millions of tourists visiting the Hawaiian islands, have also intrigued scientists with a long-running mystery: If they are so close together, how did they develop in two parallel tracks over the same hot spot—and why are their chemical compositions so different? (New York Times) Why are there volcanoes in Hawaii? Teachers, scroll down for … Continue reading Why Two Volcanoes in Hawaii Are So Close, but So Different