Educator Spotlight: Taking Action to Bolster the Bee Population

Kim Heckart integrated science and literacy in an inquiry unit investigating the declining bee population. Her third-graders used nonfiction texts to research the reasons behind the decline. They also communicated the problem to their school community and created bee “hotels” to help provide habitat for bees. Continue reading Educator Spotlight: Taking Action to Bolster the Bee Population

Why National Geographic Education?

What distinguishes National Geographic Education as a leader in professional development? We had a chance to ask educators at the National Geographic Education Summit, and their answers were both powerful and unpredictable. Participating in our roundtable were: Leon Tynes. Tynes teaches and serves as the technology department head at the Engineering and Science University Magnet School in West Haven, Connecticut. His students are empowered to … Continue reading Why National Geographic Education?

Celebrating and Advancing the Year of the Bird with Geo-Inquiry

By Alex Oberle The feathery smudge was an epitaph inscribed on a high window of an Iowa home, a sad homage to a migration that came to a sudden and final end. Was the smudge left by an ovenbird, already 700 miles of flight but one unyielding window short of the dense woods of central Ontario? Or was the smudge left by a black-and-white warbler, … Continue reading Celebrating and Advancing the Year of the Bird with Geo-Inquiry

Educator Spotlight: Working Together for a Cleaner School Environment

Helen Pugh used the Geo-Inquiry Process as a framework to guide her students in action projects within their school. Groups of Helen’s students developed projects related to composting, food waste reduction, gardening, and more, all with the goal of creating a cleaner school environment. Continue reading Educator Spotlight: Working Together for a Cleaner School Environment