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Five Steps for Teaching the Geo-Inquiry Process in an ELA Classroom

This post was written by English Language Arts educator Dr. Aspen Mock. “In every outthrust headland, in every curving beach, in every grain of sand there is a story of the earth.” –Rachel Carson Which of the following disciplines is inherently geographic? Science? Social Studies?  Geography? World Cultures? Fine Arts? English Language Arts (ELA)? The correct answer is: all the above. Every academic discipline connects … Continue reading Five Steps for Teaching the Geo-Inquiry Process in an ELA Classroom

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Strategy Share: Inspiring Action During Out of School Time

Join us for a series of free webinars to learn from Willie and other experts how you can safely do a BioBlitz with students or children at home. A BioBlitz is a great way to connect with nature while social distancing, and can be done individually or in groups, outside or from home, and with or without technology and devices. Learn more and register here! … Continue reading Strategy Share: Inspiring Action During Out of School Time

Educator Spotlight: Taking Action to Bolster the Bee Population

Kim Heckart integrated science and literacy in an inquiry unit investigating the declining bee population. Her third-graders used nonfiction texts to research the reasons behind the decline. They also communicated the problem to their school community and created bee “hotels” to help provide habitat for bees. Continue reading Educator Spotlight: Taking Action to Bolster the Bee Population

Why National Geographic Education?

What distinguishes National Geographic Education as a leader in professional development? We had a chance to ask educators at the National Geographic Education Summit, and their answers were both powerful and unpredictable. Participating in our roundtable were: Leon Tynes. Tynes teaches and serves as the technology department head at the Engineering and Science University Magnet School in West Haven, Connecticut. His students are empowered to … Continue reading Why National Geographic Education?

Celebrating and Advancing the Year of the Bird with Geo-Inquiry

By Alex Oberle The feathery smudge was an epitaph inscribed on a high window of an Iowa home, a sad homage to a migration that came to a sudden and final end. Was the smudge left by an ovenbird, already 700 miles of flight but one unyielding window short of the dense woods of central Ontario? Or was the smudge left by a black-and-white warbler, … Continue reading Celebrating and Advancing the Year of the Bird with Geo-Inquiry