This Week in Geographic History, November 28 – December 4

Here’s an advance look at a some of the “This Day in Geographic History” (TDIGH) events coming up this week.  For each date, we’ve matched it with a map or visual, background information, and a classroom activity so you can plan ahead. Tuesday, November 29 TDIGH: Palestine Divided The UN’s 1947 decision to divide the British territory into a Jewish and an Arab state resulted … Continue reading This Week in Geographic History, November 28 – December 4

Maps Show Where Tourists Go—and Where Locals Do

GEOGRAPHY If you want to find tourists snapping pictures, you probably know where to go—Times Square in New York City, the Embarcadero in San Francisco, or Chicago’s Magnificent Mile. But what locals think is picture-worthy in these cities is often substantially different. (Washington Post) Use our resources to better understand urban geography. Teachers, scroll down for a quick list of key resources in our Teachers’ … Continue reading Maps Show Where Tourists Go—and Where Locals Do

Hiking Map for The Martian?

GEOGRAPHY The British mapping agency has released an easy-to-read terrain map of The Martian astronaut Mark Watney’s home-away-from-home. (BBC) Play our genuinely fun game to explore Mars with a more basic map. Educators, scroll down for a quick list of key resources in our Teachers’ Toolkit, including a map of Mars—and a map of The Martian. Discussion Ideas The new map of Mars was created … Continue reading Hiking Map for The Martian?

The #TeachNatGeo List: The Power of Maps

It’s Geography Awareness Week and this year’s theme is “The Power of Maps.” At National Geographic, we like maps a lot, but for Juan Valdes, they are his life. Juan is the official geographer of the National Geographic Society. That means he is in charge of all things map-related. If we are talking about “The Power of Maps,” there is no one better to talk … Continue reading The #TeachNatGeo List: The Power of Maps

#tbt: “Hell sure is a popping!”

How National Geographic Mapped a World at War By Michael Fry Senior Map Librarian, National Geographic Library From the earliest issues, National Geographic magazine’s map supplements were topical and timely, of equal interest to geographers and observers of world affairs. Polar exploration, the Spanish-American and Boer Wars, the decades-long effort to construct a canal across Central America—all were featured in the magazine’s pages, and all … Continue reading #tbt: “Hell sure is a popping!”