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Educator Spotlight: Investigating Ecosystem Diversity

Zana Pouncey, an educator at a botanical garden, asked students to step into the shoes of botanists studying the diversity of native plants in an ecosystem. Following methods used by the garden’s conservation team, students practiced identifying plants and conducted diversity surveys. Continue reading Educator Spotlight: Investigating Ecosystem Diversity

Venus Flytraps Don’t Trap Insects that Pollinate Them

SCIENCE New research identifies the brave insects that pollinate carnivorous plants, and the fact that the trap and the flower don’t get much overlap traffic. (Washington Post) For Venus flytraps, catching prey is as easy as one, two, three. Count on it with our study guide. Teachers, scroll down for a quick list of key resources in our Teachers Toolkit. Discussion Ideas The popularity of … Continue reading Venus Flytraps Don’t Trap Insects that Pollinate Them

How Flowering Plants Conquered the World

SCIENCE Scientists think they have the answer to what Charles Darwin called an “abominable mystery”: How flowers evolved and spread to become the dominant plants on Earth. (BBC) Get this game to teach young students basic botany. Teachers, scroll down for a quick list of key resources in our Teachers Toolkit. Discussion Ideas New research digs into the genetics of flowering plants. What are flowering … Continue reading How Flowering Plants Conquered the World

First Trees on Earth Ripped Themselves Apart to Grow

SCIENCE Researchers do not know why trees from more than 300 million years ago have more complex structures than trees today. (Independent) How else have trees adapted? Teachers, scroll down for a quick list of key resources in our Teachers Toolkit. Discussion Ideas Scientists are surprised at the growth pattern of ancient trees. What 300-million-year-old tree species was studied? The new study examined Cladoxylopsida, extinct … Continue reading First Trees on Earth Ripped Themselves Apart to Grow

My, What Big Leaves You Have

SCIENCE Why do plants’ leaves shrink the further from the Equator they grow? It may all have to do with maintaining a comfortable temperature. (New Scientist) Sure, they can get up and leaf. But can plants hear? Teachers, scroll down for our quick list of key resources in our Teachers Toolkit.   Discussion Ideas New research hints that climate contributes to the size of a … Continue reading My, What Big Leaves You Have