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Explore the Legacy of Generations Past With These Lessons From Route 66

Melodie N. Graves, a storyteller with the Route 66 team of 2892 Miles to Go: Geographic Walk for Justice, wrote this post. When many people think of Texas, they think of cowboys. Images of big hats, bucking broncos, and open plains come to mind. Very often, perhaps always, these images feature cowboys who are white men. But there is a long, unacknowledged history of Black … Continue reading Explore the Legacy of Generations Past With These Lessons From Route 66

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Teach History Inclusively With These Eight Community-Centric Lessons

National Geographic Explorer Ashley Lamb-Sinclair, steward of 2892 Miles to Go: Geographic Walk for Justice, wrote this post. In the spring of 2013, I took a busload of 15-year-olds to hear the Dalai Lama speak in our hometown of Louisville, Kentucky. His visit was a culminating moment after a year of citywide engagement with the global Charter for Compassion. My students were among hundreds who … Continue reading Teach History Inclusively With These Eight Community-Centric Lessons

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Infinite ʻĀina: Introducing the 2892 Hawaiʻi Storytellers

So often, education is centered on a narrative of personalization and individualized student learning. As teachers, much of the way we are encouraged to design learning experiences for students is to center and craft around the learner. We place students in a classroom and build the world around them. This posits humans as central and superior to the environment around them. However, our world and … Continue reading Infinite ʻĀina: Introducing the 2892 Hawaiʻi Storytellers

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Rediscovering Black History in Louisville: A Reflection

For Black people, the Ohio River isn’t just any river—just like the Red Sea isn’t just any sea to Christian believers.  When enslaved Africans escaped from plantations to go North, the Ohio served as an almost-there point. They knew freedom waited on the other side if they could get there. Can you imagine facing that huge river, understanding what it meant once you got to the other side, while also remembering the family and friends you had to leave behind? Continue reading Rediscovering Black History in Louisville: A Reflection