There is a Map for Everyone

politics, sociology, biology, and math. Maps can illustrate data beyond numbers, so we can actually see the physical reality and the projection of those numbers onto a map. Once we see the visual, reality hits and the story unfolds. Then we can do something about it. Maps help people better understand their physical space, so we can digest it visually, then think about it critically. Now that I have maps as tools for understanding about what happened to Little Africa, and how history touched not only my own family, but my community, I can put them to use. I can use these maps to honor the legacy of Little Africa and to ignite conversation in my community about how not to perpetuate similar violence now. Holding a map in our hand can be the difference between causing harm or rectifying it. Continue reading There is a Map for Everyone

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Finding Hope in My Fifth Graders’ Podcast Project: A Reflection

The students decided they wanted to build connections to the local land through discussions with Indigenous elders, community members, authors, and science experts. They wanted to help others connect with nature and one another. And they were curious enough to find ways to make this happen. Continue reading Finding Hope in My Fifth Graders’ Podcast Project: A Reflection

Going Beyond Black Wall Street: Opening Students to a World of Black Heritage in their Own Backyard

r over 30 years, before I ever heard about it in school. No one ever told me how our family might be connected to this history. All I knew as a child was that my mom was born in Tuskegee, Alabama (with all of its loaded history) and my dad came from Cleveland, Tennessee (a city situated next to a Sundown town known as Ducktown – the name made famous by the slogan “any Blacks caught here better duck”). And as far as I knew, we were the first generation in our family to make the journey from the deep south to Oklahoma territory. Or so I thought, but that is a separate story I am exploring in my role as a Wayfinder for the 2892 Miles to Go Project.  Continue reading Going Beyond Black Wall Street: Opening Students to a World of Black Heritage in their Own Backyard

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Advance Your Learning Journey With These Newly Reopened Courses

Do you want to connect with a global community of educators while transforming your teaching practice? If so, National Geographic’s free online courses for educators may be the perfect opportunity for you. Six of our courses are paced and cohort-based, with a limited number of sections per year. Enrollment for winter 2022 is open now, and the courses begin on January 19. Continue reading Advance Your Learning Journey With These Newly Reopened Courses