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How Our Arctic-Themed Art Contest Honors Young People’s Calls to Action

National Geographic Explorer Dr. Jennie Warmouth wrote this post. When I traveled to the Arctic Circle as a Grosvenor Teacher Fellow in 2019, my students at Spruce Elementary School followed along as I posted photos and stories from the field. For most, these daily snapshots provided a first glimpse into the Arctic’s pristine beauty and magnificent wildlife. My students responded with awe and wonder followed … Continue reading How Our Arctic-Themed Art Contest Honors Young People’s Calls to Action

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Join Us 6/6 for A Star-Studded Explorer Classroom. Plus, Fun Summer Ideas

As the school year comes to a close, National Geographic Education recognizes the need for young people to continue exploring and learning outside the classroom. Kick off summer by participating in the season finale of Explorer Classroom on Monday, June 6, at 2 p.m. ET, where students will be able to ask a group of our Explorers about their exciting work. Then, challenge your students … Continue reading Join Us 6/6 for A Star-Studded Explorer Classroom. Plus, Fun Summer Ideas

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My Country Added Climate to the Curriculum. Now the Real Work Starts

Participants in my master’s degree study expressed confidence in delivering lessons on climate change even though they admitted to limited exposure while they were students. Now that it is a requirement for social studies teachers in Jamaica to teach global climate change, I see it as the perfect opportunity to engage my colleagues about climate change education—and recommend to them the “Teaching Global Climate Change” course that made such a difference for me! Continue reading My Country Added Climate to the Curriculum. Now the Real Work Starts

There is a Map for Everyone

politics, sociology, biology, and math. Maps can illustrate data beyond numbers, so we can actually see the physical reality and the projection of those numbers onto a map. Once we see the visual, reality hits and the story unfolds. Then we can do something about it. Maps help people better understand their physical space, so we can digest it visually, then think about it critically. Now that I have maps as tools for understanding about what happened to Little Africa, and how history touched not only my own family, but my community, I can put them to use. I can use these maps to honor the legacy of Little Africa and to ignite conversation in my community about how not to perpetuate similar violence now. Holding a map in our hand can be the difference between causing harm or rectifying it. Continue reading There is a Map for Everyone

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Finding Hope in My Fifth Graders’ Podcast Project: A Reflection

The students decided they wanted to build connections to the local land through discussions with Indigenous elders, community members, authors, and science experts. They wanted to help others connect with nature and one another. And they were curious enough to find ways to make this happen. Continue reading Finding Hope in My Fifth Graders’ Podcast Project: A Reflection