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How My Geography Class Used Tins to Tell the Story of Place

I loved and appreciated the insights that students shared with me through their Story of Place assignments. Fast-forward to this September: we were back in the classroom full-time, and I wanted to transform the project into something more tangible. Continue reading How My Geography Class Used Tins to Tell the Story of Place

Going Beyond Black Wall Street: Opening Students to a World of Black Heritage in their Own Backyard

r over 30 years, before I ever heard about it in school. No one ever told me how our family might be connected to this history. All I knew as a child was that my mom was born in Tuskegee, Alabama (with all of its loaded history) and my dad came from Cleveland, Tennessee (a city situated next to a Sundown town known as Ducktown – the name made famous by the slogan “any Blacks caught here better duck”). And as far as I knew, we were the first generation in our family to make the journey from the deep south to Oklahoma territory. Or so I thought, but that is a separate story I am exploring in my role as a Wayfinder for the 2892 Miles to Go Project.  Continue reading Going Beyond Black Wall Street: Opening Students to a World of Black Heritage in their Own Backyard

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I Saw the Arctic Up Close. Now I’m Using It to Teach Math.

I believe it is essential that educators interweave climate literacy into all contents. We need to respect and be responsible for our world. We can do this by recognizing we are all leaders and problem solvers and by helping young people see themselves as capable of solving this crisis. They can make a difference, but we need to empower them. That is my role. Continue reading I Saw the Arctic Up Close. Now I’m Using It to Teach Math.

Land Acknowledgements as Living Things

Land acknowledgements have become features of educational spaces. We’re in contact with them in email signatures, website homepages, at the start of conferences, and more, replicated or repeated seemingly from templates. In the classroom, land acknowledgements are often couched in a conversation with #decolonizing a lesson. But are these statements doing what we want them to do?  Continue reading Land Acknowledgements as Living Things